?

Log in

// OMG WE'RE ALL GOING TO DIE!!1!! / - casual synchronicity
Linkage: Manage Links | LJSeek | Joule | IMEEM | Piperka Webcomics | Space Needle Webcam | Chore Wars | FriendFeed Syndcates: | Del.icio.us | Last.FM December 2010
 
 
 
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
 
aaangyl
aaangyl
YES WE CAN HAS!
Fri, Dec. 19th, 2008 05:19 pm
// OMG WE'RE ALL GOING TO DIE!!1!! /

Well, you know, eventually.

Now that everything is covered in ice and snow and is brittle, it's the perfect time for a weekend-long windstorm.

K THX THAT'S ENUFF NOW WEATHER.

At least I have plenty of coffee.

12CommentReplyShare

adameros
adameros
A Quark of A Different Spin.
Sat, Dec. 20th, 2008 01:24 am (UTC)

Last year windstorms caused (as I remember) around a 100,000 houses to lose power, and some areas took three weeks to get power back.

Wheee!!!!! (Gonads and strife!)


ReplyThread
stemware
Rob
Sat, Dec. 20th, 2008 03:01 am (UTC)

But you didn't even get any real snow?


ReplyThread
aaangyl
aaangyl
YES WE CAN HAS!
Sat, Dec. 20th, 2008 03:16 am (UTC)

What's real snow? We got multiple inches, and it's stuck around for DAYS now.


ReplyThread Parent
stemware
Rob
Sat, Dec. 20th, 2008 03:19 am (UTC)

If in Mary's pictures you still see the pavement on I-5 and it looks swept clean, you don't have real snow.


ReplyThread Parent
aaangyl
aaangyl
YES WE CAN HAS!
Sat, Dec. 20th, 2008 03:27 am (UTC)

There's more or less solid ice on the street in front of my house and there's still inches of snow in my yard, I can take pics if you disbelieve.


ReplyThread Parent
stemware
Rob
Sat, Dec. 20th, 2008 03:28 am (UTC)

Oh, I believe you, but it doesn't take all that much snow to make an icy street.


ReplyThread Parent
aaangyl
aaangyl
YES WE CAN HAS!
Sat, Dec. 20th, 2008 03:49 am (UTC)

Also, places where it doesn't snow regularly are a lot less prepared for snow. They don't pre-salt the streets, and there's no fleet of plows or anything like there was in Colorado, so it doesn't take nearly as much to make for hazards.


ReplyThread Parent
stemware
Rob
Sat, Dec. 20th, 2008 03:59 am (UTC)

Hey, weather is weather. Just because you're not prepared for it doesn't make it worse :-)

The snow in the Springs was well-behaved snow, for the most part. Moisture content was low and more direct sunlight generally meant it didn't stay around as long. Even Denver rarely gets a whole lot of real snow.

A couple years ago, I was out in Evergreen, about 9000 feet up 20 miles west of Denver. It was January and there was snow everywhere. It seemed normal to me, but after dodging snow drifts and ice, my uncle said, "Hey, be careful out there! It's never been this bad!" I gave him the two-heads look. Then again, even though he's been in Colorado for close to 30 years, he did indeed grow up in Orlando :-)

Here we get a blizzard on average every 4 to 6 years, which means we're about due. The last one was in 2003 and we got 25 inches over 2 1/2 days. They normally don't treat roads here other than main thoroughfares, and only expressways get pre-treated. It's quite a contrast to what they do up north. Go 100 miles north and winter changes remarkably. Go up by the Great Lakes and the storm you had happens on a daily basis in December and January. I didn't grow up with that, but I grew up with something in between. Then again, I realized a few years ago that it was just plain easier to live somewhere moderately neutral and stick close to home when the weather is bad, even if I'm trying to encourage Morgan to get a Forrester :-)


ReplyThread Parent
aaangyl
aaangyl
YES WE CAN HAS!
Sat, Dec. 20th, 2008 04:14 am (UTC)

One winter, in Co.Springs, it snowed many feet, and then the plows came through, and then the top layer froze. My car was basically encased in an ice-lined brick of snow on the side of the road. It was freaky.


ReplyThread Parent
stemware
Rob
Sat, Dec. 20th, 2008 04:32 am (UTC)

When I grew up, the farm where my father worked was on a flood plain. There were houses down there along with farmland, but still, it was a flood plain. Every so many years, houses would be surrounded with water. In 1972, a year after I was born, they were surrounded with 15 feet of water. In 1975, we were living in a house on the flood plain. We had three feet of water in our living room (good news - in 1972 there was no flood insurance but in 1975 there was, thank you Richard Nixon).

Anyway, that's not the story.

The story is this -

About ten years ago, long after I moved away, there was a flood. In mid-February there was a thaw when there was a foot or two of snow on the ground. This was followed very rapidly by heavy rain, something about moisture getting sucked up the coast from the Gulf of Mexico. Well, rain on packed snow is a bad idea - the snow prevents it from draining into the ground and since it melts more quickly it contributes to the general water-logging. Anyway, in the end the snow melted and they had a couple feet of water hanging around. And a cold front came through with temperatures dropping down to about minus ten (not that unusual there in February). By morning, there was ice an inch thick on the receding flood waters... For weeks there were chunks of ice everywhere!


ReplyThread Parent
stemware
Rob
Sat, Dec. 20th, 2008 03:48 am (UTC)

I can tell you horror stories... but you got us beat on wind.


ReplyThread Parent
aaangyl
aaangyl
YES WE CAN HAS!
Sat, Dec. 20th, 2008 03:50 am (UTC)

Fortunately, it looks like windpocalypse will be mostly to the East.


ReplyThread Parent